Minneapolis Moline Paint Numbers

Minneapolis Moline
paint numbers

If you know of different paint codes for any Minneapolis-Moline or Twin City tractor please send them to me. If any of you can give me a break down of what colors were used for what years, let me know.

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The information on this page is outdated and is only presented as a historical record for this site.

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Posted by John McLucas on November 05, 2001 at 19:56:36: 
Greetings to all Moline enthusiasts. Here is my latest 
compilation of paint information for all MM models. My info
comes from research and from you guys. Corrections and
additions are always welcome. 

Sincerely,
John McLucas in Georgia.
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MM Paint
According to paint codes there are three recognized shades
of Prairie Gold. The original prairie gold color was used about
two years. The three listed shades of Prairie Gold paint
colors are: 

1. Original Prairie Gold (used only two years, 1936/37, or 
maybe 37/38)

2. Prairie Gold Number two ( used from 1938-55, and to 1959
on the GBs)

3. Power Yellow (used from 1956-61 on Powerline models & 
until 1962/63 on the early Four Star, Four Star Super, M5, 
M-504, GVI, & G-704 tractors ) Even though the name is Power 
Yellow, this is actually a darker, more orange Prairie Gold, 
often referred to as Orange Prairie Gold or Late Prairie Gold.

4. In 1962/1963 the Energy Yellow color (an industrial yellow)
replaced Power Yellow. 

What Parts are painted MM Cherry Red? 
Matt Gall shared this story about talking with a nice gentleman 
who worked for MM in the paint department from about 1948 to 
1955. The conversation took place about 1980. Matt questioned 
him about what parts were painted red. His answer was very 
revealing. He told that they would get the paint out at the start 
of the day and paint till it ran out. At the end of the day, if they 
had extra prairie gold, they would paint hubs or other parts till 
it was gone. If they had extra red paint, they would paint whatever 
they could find. 

Matt had seen two UBs with red grills. He checked them and did 
not find any yellow under the red.This gentleman told Matt that 
they did paint a few UB grills red. He also revealed that a few 
times they ran out of red paint. He said, "We painted some Us 
and UBs that didn't have a drop of red paint on them.

Matts sound advice is, Don't worry about what is the "right" 
color for parts on your tractor. Check to see what color is under
all the dirt, and paint it that color. If you want prairie gold wheels,
do it. There is no right or wrong color in painting parts.

According to Dave S, I am old enough to have seen all of these
in person at some time. Some of the very first 4 Stars looked like
445 Universals and were painted the same. Some of the first Four
Stars had 445 grills and were painted just like a 445 (ie power 
yellow with red wheels - no metallic brown) Apparently MM used
up paint and parts when new models were introduced, or maybe 
these were pre-production tractors that eventually were sold. 

The Minneapolis-Moline Visionlined Z tractors began in 1936. 
These were the first tractors developed, produced and marketed 
under the Minneapolis-Moline brand name. Only 37 Zs were made
that first year. From Brian Rukes, There is historical reference that 
the 1936 ZTs were painted gray with red wheels, just like the 
MM/Twin City JT. The old saying that early Z's were nothing more 
than a JT with an RE engine stuck on them really made a lot of sense 
and was closer to the truth than many of us realized. In truth, that 1936
ZT did look a LOT like a JT, right down to the air cleaner out front. 
(B. Rukes) That could mean that original Prairie Gold number one color 
was first used on the Z in 1937, not 1936. The MM Twin City Model JTs 
were made 1934-1937. From John Grandfield we learned that his 1937 
JTU (serial number 75 from the last made), came with an RE engine, 
and was prairie gold, including inside the bell housing and under the 
strap irons on the front end. It also had the usual air cleaner for a Z.
 
The following Prairie Gold trimmed in MM cherry red Letter models
were offered between 1936-59. Original Prairie Gold was used the 
first two years (lets say 1936/37 and possibly 1938. Prairie Gold 
Number two was used on the letter models from about 1938/39-1959. 
If you have a 1938 ZT, GT, or UT, I do not know exactly which prairie 
gold (PG1 or PG2) is correct. Here are my best deductions based on 
many responses. 

Z   1936 Gray with MM Cherry Red Wheels
Z   1937-38 Original Prairie Gold One with MM Cherry Red wheels
Z   1939-55 Prairie Gold Number Two with MM Cherry Red wheels
U   1938 PG1 or PG2 ? with MM Cherry Red Wheels
U   1939-57 Prairie Gold Number Two with MM Cherry Red wheels
G   1938 PG1 or PG2 ? with MM Cherry Red Wheels
G   1939-54 Prairie Gold Number Two with MM Cherry Red wheels
GB 1955-59 Prairie Gold Number Two with MM Cherry Red wheels, 
      silver rims
R 1939-55 Prairie Gold Number Two with MM Cherry Red wheels
 
Also the Uni-Tractor was designed, built, and marketed by M-M from 
1951-1963. Early Unis were Prairie Gold No. 2 and MM Cherry Red. 
The Brown Mule Uni (Metallic Brown with Power Yellow wheels) was 
introduced circa 1960. 

Uni-Tractor L 1951-55 PG2 & MM Cherry Red wheels
Uni-Tractor L 1956-59 Power Yellow with MM Cherry Red wheels
Uni-Tractor 1960-63 Metallic Brown with Power Yellow wheels
New Idea 700, 1964 Dyna Brown Color 

In 1951, M-M purchased the BF Avery company and began selling the 
Minneapolis-Moline models V, BF, and BGs were trimmed in MM Cherry 
Red. (I do not know if the Prairie Gold of 1956-57 Avery MMs continued 
to be PG2 or was switched to Power Yellow when the Powerline series 
was introduced. My opinion is that all Avery MMs were PG2)
V 1951-55 Hercules IZB3 PG2 & Cherry Red
BF 1951-57 27 belt hp Hercules IXB3SL PG2 & Cherry Red
BG 1951-57 27 belt hp Hercules 1X3SL PG2 & Cherry Red 

The Minneapolis-Moline Powerline series replaced the letter series. 
Coverage of the lower to mid power ranges was established by this 
line of M-M tractor models. MM slightly changed the color to Power 
Yellow with the introduction of the 335, 445 & 5-Star "Power-lined" 
series. These replaced the R, Z, & U. Although it is very similar in color 
to PG2, power Yellow is darker, more orange than Prairie Gold Two. 
The wheel trim continued to be MM Cherry Red.

335, 1956-61 33 belt hp Power Yellow & MM Cherry Red
445, 1956-59 41 belt hp Power Yellow & MM Cherry Red
Five Star 1957-61 54 pto hp Power Yellow & MM Cherry Red 

In 1959 the entire Jet Star tractor is metallic brown. The wheels are 
trimmed in Power Yellow, and if equipped with power adjustable rear 
rims they are silver. 

Jet Star, 1959-62 44 pto hp. Metallic Brown with Power Yellow Wheels 
In 1959, on the Four Star, Four Star Super, M5, M-504, GVI, & G-704 tractors, 
the tin is painted Power Yellow and the cast iron is painted Metallic Brown.
The hood on the M5, M-504, GVI, & G-704 tractors had a dark maroon red 
accent stripe (the same dark red as the decals.) The wheels are the same 
yellow as the tractor tin. If equipped with Power adjustable rear wheels, 
the rims are silver. MM used two brown colors as the early Four Star, Four 
Star Super, M5, M-504, GVI, & G-704 used a metallic brown color. I do not 
know exactly when the change to Dyna Brown occurred, but I believe it was 
1963 when the Energy Yellow color (an industrial yellow) was introduced. 
That could mean that Metallic Brown goes with Power Yellow and Dyna Brown 
goes with Energy Yellow. MM paint departments most likely used up existing 
supplies before switching to the new Energy Yellow and Dyna Brown. If that is 
correct the early Four Star, Four Star Super, M5, GVI, & G-704 were painted Power 
Yellow (the late or orange prairie gold) and Metallic Brown, then in late 1962 or 
early 1963 the colors on these models were changed to Energy Yellow 
(an industrial yellow) and Dyna Brown? 

Four Star.......... 1959-62.. Power Yellow and Metallic Brown
Four Star.......... 1963-64.. Energy Yellow and Dyna Brown
Four Star Super... 1959-62.. Power Yellow and Metallic Brown
Four Star Super... 1963-64.. Energy Yellow and Dyna Brown
M-5................ 1960-62.. Power Yellow and Metallic Brown
M-5................ 1963-64.. Energy Yellow and Dyna Brown 
M-504............. 1962...... Power Yellow and Metallic Brown
G-VI............... 1959-62.. Power Yellow and Metallic Brown
G-704.............. 1962...... Power Yellow and Metallic Brown
G-705, & G-706.. 1962-65.. Energy Yellow and Dyna Brown 

In 1962/63 MM introduced Energy Yellow (an industrial yellow). 
The change from metallic brown to Dyna Brown occurred by or at this time. 
On the following models the cast metal is Dyna Brown and the tin is Energy 
Yellow with some white hood trim. In 1967 the Dyna Brown is dropped and 
MM tractors were predominately yellow and white with a black hood stripe.
 
Jet Star 2, 1963. Energy Yellow and Dyna Brown
Jet Star 3, 1964-65 Energy Yellow and Dyna Brown
Jet Star 3 Super 1965-66 Energy Yellow and Dyna Brown
Jet Star 3 Super 1967-70 Energy Yellow and White with black trim on hood
M-602 1963-64 Energy Yellow and Dyna Brown, white bandana
M-604 1963-64 Energy Yellow and Dyna Brown, white bandana
M-670 1964-65 Energy Yellow and Dyna Brown, white bandana
M670 Super 1966- Energy Yellow and Dyna Brown
M670 Super 1967-70 Energy Yellow and White with black trim on hood
U-302 1964-65 Energy Yellow and Dyna Brown, white bandana 
U302 Super 1966 Energy Yellow and Dyna Brown
U302 Super 1967-70 Energy Yellow and White with black trim on hood 

The M-M G series tractors were all six cylinder by 1959. They were the 
largest most powerful series of M-M tractors. The tin on the G-VI and G-704 
was painted Power Yellow and the cast iron was Metallic Brown. The hood 
on the GVI, & G-704 tractors had a dark maroon red accent stripe (the same 
dark red as the decals.) The wheels are the same yellow as the tractor tin. If 
equipped with Power adjustable rear wheels, the rims are silver.

G-VI................. 1959-62 Power Yellow and Metallic Brown
G-704...4-WD..... 1962 Power Yellow and Metallic Brown 
Then beginning with the G-705, & G-706 the tin color was Energy Yellow 
with white bandana trim across the front and grill. The hood had a black 
trim band. On the G-707 & G-708 the white bandana trim stripe was raised 
up and extended all the way down the sides of the hood with the 
Minneapolis-Moline name decal on this white stripe. The brown color on 
the cast iron was changed from metallic to Dyna Brown and the rear wheels 
were Energy Yellow with silver rear rims. Early G1000s wore Energy Yellow 
tin with Dyna Brown cast metal. 

G-705, & G-706.... 1962-65 Energy Yellow and Dyna Brown, white bandana
G-707 & G-708..... 1965- Energy Yellow and Dyna Brown 
G-1000............... 1965-66 Energy Yellow and Dyna Brown 
Beginning in 1967 the Dyna Brown was dropped. Yellow and white two tone 
hood with black trim band set the tone for the remainder of the MMs existence. 
Fenders and cast metal were Industrial Yellow. In the 1970s some wheels were 
white with silver rims.(Which models? Probably the Oliver Molines influence.)

G-1000 ........................ 1967-69 Yellow, White, with Black hood trim band
G-900 & G-1000 Vista....... 1967-70 Yellow, White, with Black hood trim band
G-950, G-1050 & G-1350... 1969-71 Yellow, White, with Black hood trim band
G-1355.......................... 1972-73 Yellow, White, with Black hood trim band
G-955........................... 1973-74 Yellow, White, with Black hood trim band 

White Motor Company purchased Oliver Farm Equipment Corp. in 1960, 
Cockshutt Farm Equipment Corp. in 1962, and M-M in 1963. After the purchase, 
White began consolidating production of the tractor brands and sold the following 
four Oliver models as Oliver, Cockshutt, and M-M with the principal differences 
being the paint color, decals, and grill. These were mid-sized Oliver tractors 
painted Oliver meadow green trimmed in clover white, MM energy yellow or 
Cockshutt red. The Oliver Molines had white wheels with the rear rims painted 
silver. They were: 

MM G-550 1971 only =Oliver 1555 1970-75 also =Cockshutt 1555 53 pto hp 
MM G-750 1971 only =Oliver 1655 1969-75 also =Cockshutt 1655 70 pto hp 
MM G-850 1971 only =Oliver 1755 1970-75 also =Cockshutt 1755 86 pto hp 
MM G-940 1971 only =Oliver 1855 1969-75 also =Cockshutt 1855 92 pto hp 

From 1971-1975 White sold two diesel imports made in Italy by Fiat as Oliver, 
MM, &Cockshutt. These were identical tractors with different paint colors, decals, 
and grills. 
MM G-350 (1971 only) = Oliver 1265 (1971-75) = Cockshutt 1265 41 pto hp. - 3-cylinder
MM G-450 (1971 only) = Oliver 1365 (1971-75) = Cockshutt 1365 54 pto hp. - 4-cylinder 

In the 1970s some of the G-1050, G-1350, and A4T-1600s were painted Heritage 
colors in celebration of the upcoming 1976 American bicentennial. (i.e. red and 
white with blue trim band and blue stars.) Not all Red MM's were heritage, some 
were just plain red and white (A4T's, G1050s, & G1350s.) This red appears to be 
the same as the White Motor Co. "Sumac red" as applied to most MM implements 
and White Combines. (M. Johnson) White Motor Co.had purchased MM in 1963.
Also from Martin Johnson, On My A4T-1600 the black hood stripe is actually 3M 
reflector tape. being silver in the dark!!! Also the MM decal on the LP fuel tank is 
reflectorized. From Roger Brock, I have a 1970 G-1050 that also has the reflective 
black stripe. And from John Grandfield, I had a M5 with a reflective black stripe.) 
Also don't forget about the 50 & 55 series that are stenciled Minneapolis Moline, 
but are Oliver Green with Clover white wheels & trim! I can't wait until we have the 
puzzle figured out, all things I'm working on for my MM history book. - -food for 
thought - - great work John. - - MAJ



RED: 1. M-M Implement Red Part # JT9060 (Original Color) 2. Martin-Senour Synthol Cherry Red # 90G540 3. Martin-Senour Acrylic Enamel Cherry Red # 99G540 YELLOW: 1. M-M # 15P1015 - Yellow Gloss Enamel (Original Color) 2. White Farm Equip. - Enamel - M-M Industrial Yellow #20-7002235 3. Martin Senour-Acrylic Enamel Federal Yellow # MSE 036A (M-M Industrial Yellow) 4. Dupont Centrai-Penske Yellow - Penske Leasing Co. # K9590AK (M-M Industrial Yellow) 5. Sherwin-Williams Industrial Yellow # JK 9056 PRAIRIE GOLD: 1. Dupont-Dulux Enamel #006DH Gold (Early - Original Color, used approximately 2 years). 2. P.P.G. - Acrylic Enamel # DAR 60098X (Early Gold) 3. P.P.G. - Acrylic Enamel # DAR 60039 (Prairie Gold #2) 4. Dupont-Dulux - Enamel # 020DH Orange (Late Prairie Gold) 5. AG-One-WFE Prairie Gold Enamel (old # 209002234, new #79014808) 6. AG-One-White-New Idea M-M Prairie Gold (spray can) (old # 20-7002250, new #79014834) 7. Martin-Senour Prairie Gold - Synthol Enamel # 90T3749 8. Martin-Senour Prairie Gold - Acrylic # 99L3749 9. Central Tractor Farm & Family - M-M Gold Enamel # 9432-060 BROWNS: 1. M-M Dyna Brown Enamel # 15P919 (10R1346) Original Color 2. M-M Metallic Brown - Enamel # 15P814 (Original Color) 3. P.P.G. - Acrylic Lacquer # D D L 230049 (Dyna Brown) 4. Sherwin Williams - Dyna Brown # 33-31322-G 6. Dupont Acrylic Enamel # C8194AH (Metallic Brown) GRAY: 1. M-M # JT 9057 Twin City Gray (Original Color) 2. Rust-Oleum Waukesha Gray # 724 3. P.P.G. Acrylic Enamel (T-C Gray) # DAR 31953

There are times when working on an old tractor that we have to 
decide what we are going to do with it. I have found that show
tractors need better paint than do work tractors. Keeping this in 
mind I would like to tell you of a great way to get a very nice finish
on your work or pulling tractor for very little money.

I go to my local TCS (Tractor Supply Co.) or Central Tractor and buy
BPS (Best Paint Systems) Minneapolis-Moline Gold paint for the 
tractor and New Holland Red or Farmall Red for the wheels. I then
go get Acrylic Enamel Hardner from my local parts house. Mix the
paint and hardner according to the label on the hardner. Make sure 
you use Acrylic Enamel hardner ---- it makes it much hardner than 
Enamel hardner does. Thin the paint with either Naptha thinner or 
some cheap Lacquer wash thinner. This will give you a very nice 
finish for under $100.

For those of you that think this won't work, look at my tractor. 
I painted it this way over 18 months ago and it still looks good. 
Best of all you can get spray cans to use for touch-up.

My 
Minneapolis-Moline BF

Tony 
and Mary Beth at a show
Let me know how it works for you. Tony Turner Webmaster

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